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       http://www.bottomofthehill.com/iC201704.html http://www.bottomofthehill.com/iC201705.html http://www.bottomofthehill.com/iC201706.html http://www.bottomofthehill.com/iC201707.html http://www.bottomofthehill.com/iC201708.html ••• http://www.bottomofthehill.com/iC201710.html

Listings are in the opposite order of appearance: headliner is listed at the top, next is the support band(s), and the last band listed is the opener.


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Thursday June 22 2017
 8:30PM doors -- music at 9:00PM ••• ALL AGES
$10 in advance / $12 at the door
Killer Whale
www.facebook.com/KillerWhalethomasjohnson/
 Psych R&B
Imaginary Tricks
imaginarytricks.com/
 Indie Rock
TBA  ----announced 5/28
 garage pop rock


Killer Whale
-from Baton Rouge, LA/San Francisco, CA
-Baton Rouge's Thomas Johnson moved to San Francisco and brought a bountiful sense of creativity with him. Recording as Killer Whale, Johnson crafts psychedelic rock-pop from a mixture of acoustic instruments, electronics, and layered vocals.
 



Imaginary Tricks
Mike Visser, Harlan Muir
-from Brooklyn, NY

-Imaginary Tricks takes an experimental approach to delivering a familiar thump. It’s a heartbeat, with multiple layers of complex sounds, mired in soul and hidden lyrical depth. Welcome to the world of Mike Visser, the world of Imaginary Tricks. he songs on Skommel are poignant and varied, from the surefire pop hit of  “Night Owl,” which captures the universal feeling of staying up at night, worrying yourself to bits. And there’s the rugged and rhythmic “Lights Out,” addressing the distribution of wealth in the Western world. And in the disarming “No Ordinary Guy,” Visser details his father’s immigration from South Africa to the United States.
Listen closely, and you’re inside the room with him, in the eye of a storm, whipped up by whatever inclination strikes: whistles and wah-wahs, Doppler-effect vocals and alien Wurlitzer keyboarding. For his captivating live shows, he is joined by Harlan Muir, who contributes an alchemy of sounds, combining keys and tape delay. The results are intoxicating. Much of Skommel was drafted and recorded at Japam Studio in Brooklyn. Conjuring up a romantic picture of a dank and dark place where the songs were pounded out night after night until they took shape would be a cool notion. But Imaginary Tricks songs are written in Visser’s head—one can only imagine what goes on in there—and then sketched out here, in the real world, for us to hear. Can colors, thoughts, dreams and sideways conversations be translated into words and music? After listening to Skommel, it just might seem possible.




TBA
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