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Listings are in the opposite order of appearance: headliner is listed at the top, next is the support band(s), and the last band listed is the opener.


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Thursday July 19 2018
  8:30PM doors -- music at 9:00PM
 
•••  21 AND OVER
$12
Sarah Shook & The Disarmers
www.disarmers.com/
 Country/Americana
Jason Hawk Harris
jasonhawkharris.com/
 country/americana
Secret Emchy Society
www.emchy.com/
  Americana


Sarah Shook & The Disarmers
-from Chapel Hill, NC
-Sarah Shook & the Disarmers is an old school outlaw country/Americana band with punk tendencies. Inspired by artists such as the Sex Pistols, Elliott Smith and Hank Williams, Sarah sings with confidence, control, and, at times, a hint of menace. The Disarmers match her on every track,
coloring the tales of resilience and empathy with as much urgency as ever as well as a broader sonic sweep.

Her second album 'Years' will release on April 6th, 2018. At its pounding heart, 'Years' crackles with a pointedly contemporary and relevant take on the outlaw spirit. Built around the buoyant pedal steel of Phil Sullivan, and the post-punk rattle and Live at San Quentin hum of Eric Peterson’s guitar, there are echoes of Nikki Lane and Merle Haggard as much as Ty Segall. It's home is the ragged-but-real honky tonk, not the bro-country “honky tonk.” It’s easy to hear Sarah as a close cousin to artists like Hurray for the Riff Raff and Margo Price on the title track, or in the country-‘60s mod vibe on “Lesson.”



Jason Hawk Harris
-from Houston, TX/Los Angeles, CA
-Years before developing his own brand of confessional, cathartic country music — a sound he describes as "meta-apocalyptic country/Americana grief-grass" — Jason Hawk Harris chased a different muse as a classically-trained composer.

He was rooted in the orchestral influence of modern classical music from the 20th and 21st centuries. He loved the theory, the disjunct forms and the rawest of emotional palettes. It all started with a fondness for Queen, whose albums accounted for some of the most frequently-heard records in Harris' Houston household. The band sounded progressive, mixing the punch of rock & roll with the complexity of symphonic music. From there, Harris discovered Debussy and Mozart, then Stravinsky and George Crumb. He eventually enrolled in music school and graduated with a degree in composition, which he immediately began putting to use.

After writing thousands of measures of classical music, though, Harris found himself drawn back to the country, folk, and rock music that had soundtracked his early childhood. He'd grown up listening to classic crooners like Hank Williams, Roy Orbison, Jim Croce, Patsy Cline, and Elvis. That music had laid a sort of musical bedrock that couldn't be ignored. Later, after hearing bluegrass musician Michael Daves playing a stirring guitar solo, Harris knew he needed to somehow incorporate his country-loving childhood into his songs.

"Hearing Michael Daves tackle that solo really woke me up," he remembers. "There was something wild about the way he played. He played with abandon. Something sparked in me again — the same spark I'd heard when I first discovered Brian May's guitar solo on 'It's Late' — and everything changed."

Harris began cutting his non-classical teeth with the Show Ponies, an Americana group based in L.A. He played guitar for the band and produced most of their albums, racking up several million Spotify streams along the way. Meanwhile, problems arose in his personal life — including a family history of addiction, which ultimately resulted in the early death of his mother — and began fueling Harris' need to write his own music.

Released in November 2017, the five-song Formaldehyde, Tobacco and Tulips marks Harris' debut as a solo artist. It's an emotional EP about joy, pain, sorrow, and grief, tied together with autobiographical lyrics and sharp, detail-rich songwriting. The record also paves the way for Harris' full-length album, which draws a distinct bridge between his country and classical roots.

"I love country music because it's built upon a collision of the sad and specific," says the songwriter, whose music evokes comparisons to imaginative Americana frontmen like Daniel Romano and Robert Ellis. "It is equal parts devastation and catharsis."

Although performed with traditional country instrumentation — including acoustic and electric guitar, pedal steel, bass, strings, piano, and the occasional harmonium — Harris' LP reaches far beyond the genre's rootsy influence. There are complex harmonic structures, acrobatic arrangements, and unexpected intervals. There are cathartic songs about love and addiction. A classically-trained composer turned country singer, Jason Hawk Harris proudly operates within his own lane, proving that there's something stirring and compelling about musical culture clash.

Written by Andrew Leahey



Secret Emchy Society
Cindy Emch and friends
-from Oakland, CA

-CINDY EMCH, named by the HuffingtonPost as the “First Lady of Queer Country” plays foot stompin' heart breakin' americana music about good friends and hard times. She’ll haunt you with dark, sexy, boozy ballads, off-kilter anthems, and foot stompin' heart breakin' cowboy songs performed by her band the Secret Emchy Society.  With turns that are happy, sad, heartbreaking and humble, her songs echo a variety of vintage styles, from rowdy honky tonk to vulnerable ballads, but with a queer sensibility that will still appeal to fans of June Carter Cash, Lydia Loveless, Neko Case, Shovels & Rope, Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner.

“[Emch’s songs] could be used to score a romantic montage for Bonnie and Clyde.” Now This Sound Is Brave